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Football dominates attention during Homecoming festivities

By Maddy Lewis

The AHS football team was a focal point of the Homecoming assembly. Photo courtesy of the Acorn yearbook.
The AHS football team was a focal point of the Homecoming assembly.
Photo courtesy of the Acorn yearbook

During the second week of October, the halls of AHS were filled with  energy and excitement as the school held their annual Homecoming spirit week tradition. Some consider this the best week of the year, with credit given to the Leadership class who strive for an abundance of spirited Hornets. Spirit days ranging from Tacky Tourist Day to Dynamic Duo Day lured in a wide variety of clever costumes and allowed students to appreciate a week at school that much more.

The football team rallies the crowd at the assembly. Photo courtesy of the Acorn yearbook
The football team rallies the crowd at the assembly.
Photo courtesy of the Acorn yearbook
Team members held the spotlight for part of the assembly. Photo courtesy of the Acorn yearbook
Team members held the spotlight for part of the assembly.
Photo courtesy of the Acorn yearbook

The specific days planned Monday through Thursday were designed to hype up the Homecoming pep rally on Friday, in addition to the football game, float contest and broadcast of the Homecoming court scheduled later that night. Students from all classes blanketed themselves from head to toe in their designated class color and cheered in unison with the collection of their classmates.

Homecoming occurs once a year, which explains all the enthusiasm demonstrated throughout this week. Football and other fall sports tend to receive loads of attention because of this occasion.

However, the several other sports in winter or spring do not acquire the same type of appreciation since a Homecoming rally or similar event is not included during their season.

Senior Marc Osborn, a winter athlete on the men’s soccer team, commented on the situation. “I think several sports get special treatment at this school,” he said.

Osborn agreed that the football team dominates the assembly. “It doesn’t bother me, but as a whole I know other athletes would like to participate more,” he said.

Even though there is great emphasis on the football team, suggestions for including the other sports are easier said than done. Osborn explained that arranging more pep rally assemblies would “continue to take kids out of class” and require other additional expenses that the school simply cannot afford.

Senior track member Justin Wai agreed that “some reputation would be nice” as a spring athlete.

While competing in track meets for almost four years now, Wai expressed that races require a great deal of mental focus. He justified that a pep rally for certain sports like track, “doesn’t exactly fit as much,” compared to a game like football where an extra boost of adrenaline is necessary.

Nonetheless, Wai believes the reason football is so heavily focused on is due to the constant injuries that occur almost every game. A lot of community backing is significant to the sport’s success which potentially contributes to the turnout of fans at games and popularity expressed at school.

Several student athletes appear to be upset with the bias of football defined through the Homecoming rally. In response, Gianni Duncan-Mosley, a Lady Hornet basketball player stated, “I believe that having one rally all year isn’t enough to bring recognition to all the sports.”

In regards to honoring all sports equally, Duncan-Mosley suggested, “I think the pep rally would be helpful for all rival EHS games, senior night celebrations and of course Homecoming. It would help our school become more spirited all together,” she said

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